Diabetes: Now’s the Time for Change

Did you know... Diabetes rates in Canada have almost doubled over the past ten years? This article will show you how to lower your risk of diabetes by changing the foods you eat, following the Glycemic Index (GI).

Good diabetes news

Did you know that over 50% of type 2 diabetes could be prevented or delayed with healthier eating and increased physical activity? It’s true. Simple changes in your diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.

November 14th is World Diabetes Day. It’s a great chance to learn more about diabetes and what you can do to prevent it. Mark the date on your calendar and visit www.idf.org/worlddiabetesday for more information.

What’s On My Plate?

Creating or maintaining good eating habits is important.

The plate method is a simple and well-recognized guide to portion control.
The Canadian Diabetes Association recommends:

  • Fill half an 8" plate with vegetables. Choose two or more colours if possible.
  • Choose starchy foods like whole grain breads and cereals, rice, noodles, or potatoes at every meal. Starchy foods are broken down into glucose, which your body needs for energy.
  • Include fish, lean meats, low-fat cheeses, eggs, or vegetarian protein choices.
  • Add a fruit and a serving of dairy for a well-balanced meal.

 

 

The Glycemic Index (GI)

The Canadian Diabetes Association also recommends eating foods with a low Glycemic Index (GI). The GI groups carbohydrate-rich foods by how much they raise blood glucose levels. You should choose LOW or MEDIUM GI foods more often.
 
Low GI foods:
  • Raise blood glucose slowly, which can improve your blood glucose levels after a meal.
  • Are often higher in fibre. High fibre foods help you feel full and are important if you’re trying to lose or maintain your weight.
  • May improve blood cholesterol levels, which is important for preventing heart disease.

 

GI choices: breads

Choose these low-GI breads most often:
  • 100% stone ground whole wheat
  • heavy mixed grain
  • pumpernickel
 
Choose these medium-GI breads more often:
  • whole wheat
  • rye
  • pita
 
Choose these high-GI breads less often:
  • white bread
  • kaiser roll
  • bagel, white
 
Adapted from Canadian Diabetes Association, Paving Your Path to Diabetes

 
 

GI choices: cereals

Choose these low-GI cereals most often:
  • All Bran™
  • Oat Bran™
  • Bran Buds with Psyllium™
 
Choose these medium-GI cereals more often:
  • Grapenuts™
  • puffed wheat
  • oatmeal
  • quick oats
 
Choose these high-GI cereals less often:
  • bran flakes
  • corn flakes
  • Rice Krispies™
 
Adapted from Canadian Diabetes Association, Paving Your Path to Diabetes. All trademarks are properties of their respective owners.

 
 

GI choices: grains

Choose these low-GI grains most often:
  • barley
  • bulgar
  • pasta/noodles
  • parboiled or converted rice
 
Choose these medium-GI grains more often:
  • basmati rice
  • brown rice
  • couscous
 
Choose these high-GI grains less often:
  • short-grain rice
 
Adapted from Canadian Diabetes Association, Paving Your Path to Diabetes

 
 

GI choices: other foods

Choose these other low-GI foods most often:
  • sweet potato
  • yam
  • legumes
  • lentils
  • chickpeas
  • kidney beans
  • split peas
  • soy beans
  • baked beans
 
Choose these other medium-GI foods more often:
  • potato, new/white
  • sweet corn
  • popcorn
  • Stoned Wheat Thins™
  • Ryvita™ (rye crisps)
  • black bean soup
  • green pea soup
 
Choose these other high-GI foods less often:
  • potato, baking (Russet)
  • french fries
  • pretzels
  • rice cakes
  • soda crackers
 
Adapted from Canadian Diabetes Association, Paving Your Path to Diabetes. All trademarks are properties of their respective owners.

 
 

Important information

Want to learn more about diabetes or the Glycemic Index? Just ask your Walmart pharmacist. Set up a one-on-one consultation today!


This information should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your doctor. There may be variations in treatment that your physician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances. If you have questions about your symptoms, ask the Pharmacist at Walmart for more information, and/or contact your doctor.

Legal
This article is intended as general information. Always be sure to read and follow the label(s)/instruction(s) that accompany your product(s). Walmart will not be responsible for any injury or damage caused by this activity.

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